ACEP Invites Emergency Physicians to 2017 Leadership Conference

American College of Emergency Physicians pic
American College of Emergency Physicians
Image: acep.org

Since 2013, Dr. Kenneth “Ken” Mwatha has served as an attending physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Baltimore’s St. Agnes Hospital. Alongside his day-to-day professional activities, Dr. Ken Mwatha maintains a membership in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

Throughout the year, ACEP oversees a variety of programs and events aimed at education, research, and advocacy. Currently, the organization is preparing to host its 2017 Leadership and Advocacy Conference at the Grand Hyatt Washington in Washington, D.C. The event, which will take place March 12-15, will include sessions focused on health policy and the key issues that are currently affecting emergency medicine.

In addition to featuring educational sessions led by expert faculty and panels, the conference will give attendees the opportunity to visit Capitol Hill to meet with members of Congress and other key decision-makers. Both ACEP members and non-members are invited to attend the event to sharpen their advocacy and leadership skills while helping to promote their profession. For more information about the event, visit www.acep.org.

American College of Emergency Physicians Award Ceremony

American College of Emergency Physicians pic
American College of Emergency Physicians
Image: acep.org

Ken Mwatha serves as an attending physician of emergency medicine in a Baltimore, Maryland hospital. When he is not assisting patients, Ken Mwatha stays involved with professional organizations in his field, including the American College of Emergency Physicians.

The American College of Emergency Physicians began in 1968, when a small group of doctors decided they wanted to set a higher standard for emergency care. They set out to train other physicians in how to provide quality care in this challenging setting. In 1979, emergency medicine became recognized as a specialty in the medical field.

In October of 2016, the American College of Emergency Physicians held a ceremony at its annual meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada, that honored contributions and changes made in emergency medicine. Various awards were presented to recognize accomplishments in research, advocacy within the field, education, and quality of care. In addition, the organization granted honorary memberships to various professionals within the discipline.

Supermoon Appears in November 2016

 Super Moon Image: nationalgeographic.com
Super Moon
Image: nationalgeographic.com

 

As a physician practicing emergency medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, Ken Mwatha tends to hospital patients and treats them in emergency and life-threatening situations. In his leisure time, Ken Mwatha pursues the study of astronomy.

Astronomy enthusiasts have many opportunities to view planets and celestial bodies as they go through various phases. Some change throughout the course of the year, while others occur once in a person’s lifetime.

In November of 2016, the University of Alabama offered a public viewing of the recent supermoon, a noteworthy event since the next supermoon will not occur until the year 2034. At this point in its orbit, the moon was at its fullest, passing very close to the earth. At the Gallalee Hall Observatory, the university used their reflective telescope to allow students and members of the public to view the moon even closer. Reportedly, smaller details that are not normally visible can be seen during a supermoon, such as the moon’s craters.

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